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After putting the camp or fort in order, Washington with those of his men not left to protect the stipplies, set out in the darkness for the camp of Half- King, which they reached just before daylight on the morning of the 2Sth of May. Elsewhere in this work will be found more extended mention of many in the above list and of others who have come vipon the scene in later years and are still actively engaged in business or with their professional duties. As the Three To\-ns was for a long time the head of slack-water navigation and the jiioneer p)oint in l;)oat bixilding west of the Allegheny mountains, we deem this subject worthy of considerable space. Rogers who was employed on board of her in her first trip down the river, as follows: "Our engine was on the low-pressure principle, codensing the steam, and the fires were made inside the boilers. She was open hull, and was SO feet keel and 11 feet beam. The forge was supplied with the ustial appliances for bloom making. Porter, who was the county sviperintendent of schools, and others, delivered addresses on the prospects and on the good the society could accomplish. At this meeting the rules and by-laws of the Lewistown society were adopted with such changes as to make them conform to the name of Bridgeport, or rather it was decided to do this and a committee was appointed to make he changes and report to the next meeting which it did and the whole was then adopted.

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Pa., close to what is now known as Washington's Spring and not far from the National Road. On the 30th, a few days after his encounter with and defeat of Jumon- ville's companv, Washington commenced to build a small fort with palisades at Great Meadows where some w'ork had previotisly been done. Among the physicians of long ago, we iind, Drs Jesse Pennel, H. I then became first engineer, and had to clerk as well as act as steward, there being none on board. Pringle, the latter two being the principal parties to the organization. Snowdon built the engines and all the other ironwork for steamers for Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Texas, Michigan, California and many other states. In 1816 he married Miss Mary Smith and to them were born the following Children: Ann who afterwards became the wife of Adam Jacobs, of Browns- ville; Elizabeth, wife of Walter Smith of Cincinnati, Ohio; Samuel S. (Signed) Enos Grave, Manager of the Company." The incorporators of this company were John Krepps, James Tomlinson, Elisha D. Jitly 2, and was well attended and considerable enthusiasm was manifested. Rogers, who was chairman of the previotis meeting and also chairman of the committee that had been appointed at that meeting, opened the session by reading the mintites of the previous meeting.

This is the location given Half-King's camp by Judge Veech and the place where Tumonville and his men were encamped, could not have been very far away. Washing- ton feared that as soon as the news of Jumonville's defeat and death reached the French at Fort Duquesne they would come out in great force, hence the strengthening of this unforttinate position, for that is what it certainlv proved to be. Passing from the Ohio into the Mississippi, the boat's company frec^uently saw Indians who came down to the river bank and sold them venison. He also built boats to run on the Rio Grande, for the government, during the Mexican war as well as two gunboats for the gover- ment during the Rebellion, though we understand the latter two were built at his shops in Pittsburg where he had a plant of about the same capacity as the Brownsville plant. Hunt, William Grififith, John Mc Clure Hezlip, Morris Truman and Enos Grave. In ISll, John Troth, Henry Minehart, Isaac Van Hook and others, formed a stock company and erected the first glass plant in Bridgeport. Vulcan Iron and Machine Works and the brewery, was the Brownsville Glass Works started in 1827 by George Hogg.

Among the prisoners was La Force w^ho is sometimes credited with having had charge of the French forces. Lamb, Caleb Bracken, Abraham Stanley, Matthew Oliver Jones, Charles Hubbs, W. The ' Dispatch ' was built on the spot where the ' Monument Mills' of Mason, Rogers & Co., was afterwards built (now the 'Eclipse Mills 'V The engines PROi Nl INKNT STEAMBOAT CAPTAINS. ' From there no accident occurred till the boat reached Walker's bar, below Cincinnati, and there she stuck fast and remained for two weeks before the river rose sufficiently to float her off.' ' Mr. Pringle retired from the btisiness and was succeeded by his son, J. Here were made annually the engines and all other machinery for about fifteen steamboats and as many other engines. And, in addition to the above we have two new wool carding machines with first-rate cards, and having engaged an experienced carder, we hope. Holmes Patton were then selected as a committee of three to make arrangements for the next meeting and to nominate candidates for the various offices of the society, which was to be known as the "Bridge- port Improvement Society." SECOND MEETING.

The French w'ho w^ere killed in the battle were scalped by Half-King's men and the prisoners were eventtially sent to Winchester. The death of Jumonvillc and the cajiture of his company, occurred on the morning of the 2Sth of May, 1754, in the northwest part of what is now Wharton township, Fayette Cottnty. Rogers proceeds: 'At Louisville, Captain Gregg left the boat, leaving the engineer in command. ¥•5 Snowdon Machine Shops and Two ( am boats built by Snowdon's duriii R the War. 148 The French Cotton and Woolen Mills At these shops Mr. 150 The First Glass Plant from our detcrniined intentions, to do our work with neatness and dispatch, and at the usual prices, to merit a share of the patronage. The next meeting was held at the Cumberland Presbyterian church.

Of this place Washington wrote prior to his encounter with the French, that it was " A charming place for an encounter" but it seems that he after- wards found it anything else but a " Charining place. Then Shreve started with her to Pittsburg with considerable money, but on the way up the boat was robbed (so he said) of all her money. Adjoining the latter was the pattern shop 60x40 feet, two stories high.

" On the morning of the 27th Christopher Gist arrived at Great Meadows direct from his plantation and told Washington that on the previous day a Washington's Defeat at Great Meadows 9 detachment of the French had visited his place and had committed variolas de])redations, and further informed Washino;ton that he had seen their tracks witliin live miles of Fort Neec-, Ihi' name Washington had given to his intreneliments. She finally ar- rived at the company got possession of her again. He ran her for a time, but made no monev though freight and passage was high. Another boat yard was established in West Brownsville in 1848, by John Cock and Leonard Lcnhart. These three buildings were of brick and virtually formed one building two stories high, 230 feet long and with the exception of the pattern shop, 50 feet wide.

It was the 29th of Jtme when Washington reached Gist's where he received information that a strong French and Indian force was advancing up the Monongahela river from Fort Duquesne. Abram Kimber, and ran for some years on the Ohio, between Pittsburg and Louisville, Ky. About 1826, Abel Cofhn and Michael Miller commenced the building of keel boats in Bridge]:)ort, on an extended scale, and an almost incredible number of them were turned out by these builders. Pringle built a flat-bottom boat for Robert Rogers and Samuel Clark, called the "Visitor," which ran the following suinmer from Pittsburg to Louisville, and made a remarkable success, earning ,000 more than her entire cost during that one season, and was then sold at ,000 advance on her entire cost. Au U to partnership and in the follow- ing year the Pringle Boat-Building Company was organized. This brewery used from 40,000 to 45,000 bushels of barley each year. The rate was

" On the morning of the 27th Christopher Gist arrived at Great Meadows direct from his plantation and told Washington that on the previous day a Washington's Defeat at Great Meadows 9 detachment of the French had visited his place and had committed variolas de])redations, and further informed Washino;ton that he had seen their tracks witliin live miles of Fort Neec-, Ihi' name Washington had given to his intreneliments. She finally ar- rived at the company got possession of her again. He ran her for a time, but made no monev though freight and passage was high. Another boat yard was established in West Brownsville in 1848, by John Cock and Leonard Lcnhart. These three buildings were of brick and virtually formed one building two stories high, 230 feet long and with the exception of the pattern shop, 50 feet wide. It was the 29th of Jtme when Washington reached Gist's where he received information that a strong French and Indian force was advancing up the Monongahela river from Fort Duquesne. Abram Kimber, and ran for some years on the Ohio, between Pittsburg and Louisville, Ky. About 1826, Abel Cofhn and Michael Miller commenced the building of keel boats in Bridge]:)ort, on an extended scale, and an almost incredible number of them were turned out by these builders. Pringle built a flat-bottom boat for Robert Rogers and Samuel Clark, called the "Visitor," which ran the following suinmer from Pittsburg to Louisville, and made a remarkable success, earning $2,000 more than her entire cost during that one season, and was then sold at $2,000 advance on her entire cost. Au U to partnership and in the follow- ing year the Pringle Boat-Building Company was organized. This brewery used from 40,000 to 45,000 bushels of barley each year. The rate was $1.00 per trip and 50c per day when lying over in a navigable stage of the river, and $5.00 per month in winter. A cotmcil of war was held and it was decided to con- centrate all the forces at Gist's and there take a stand against the approach- ing foe. John Cock also built a large number of them, and he as well as Coffin and Miller, btiilt some steamboats. Cock built for James May of Pittsburg, the two Ohio river steamers, "Erie" and "Shamrock." Coffin and Miller built the "Reindeer" (second of that name), the "Mountaineer,'' the "Cham]non" (Capt. Pringle, who came here from Bedford County in 1826. The first steamboat on which he worked was the "Highlander," built by Robert Rogers, opposite the saw- mill on Water street, Bridgeport. The success of this boat caused the building of others of similar construction by Mr. He then established a boat yard in West Bro\\ns\-ine. The members of this company were, John Wilkinson, James Storer, John S. It had two steep tubs of 118 barrels capacity each, the one perhaps of a little less capacity. Keel boats were charged 25c per landing or the same per day. On the 29th of November, 1842, the council of Bridgeport, in accordance with "the will of the people, expressed at a town meeting called for the Bridgeport Improvement Society 281 old l-alling Rocks. Keller & Crossan, Contractor.- of rocks down with one massive blast purpose," subscribed one hundred dollars for the purchase of a tire engine for the use of the borough. After some scouting for reputed French and Indian forces that it after- wards transpired were nine French deserters who were captured and brought into camp, Washington commenced a movement towards the mouth of Red- stone, taking the Nemacolin trail towards Gist's. Though the distance to Gist's from the fort is only thirteen miles, it took them thirteen days to make a passable road over the distance. ' She was built in John Cock's boat yard, a short distance above where Mason, Rogers &' Co.'s flouring mill then stood (now the Eclipse mill), and was launched on Christmas day in the year named. Not far below the Vulcan Iron and Machine Works along in 1825, there stood a brewery. m., on each of said days in the fourth fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth months." An addition was after- wards built to this market house. In the fall of 1832 it appears that a new market house had been built. The wharf was built in 1845 by Henry Marshall at a cost of $903.54. He [took with him all his own men, ordnance, ample ammunition and most of the wagons. Before reaching Gist's a force was Fort Necessity 11 sent ahead to open up the way from Gist's to the Redstone. Upon her completion she was placed tinder command of Capt. It was an irregular rambling mass of buildings but in the whole contained all the departments of a first-class brewery at that daj\ In 1857 this plant was enlarged by Teece & Toynbee and still more thoroughly equipped for the business. In August of that year the borough council fixed the first rate for wharfage of steamboats. Accordingly they marched in single tile, early that May morning, to the French camp and forming in line of battle with the English troops on the right and the Indians on the left, the attack was made withotit any further preliminaries. In consequence of the vast importance of the boat-building industry of this place, which is to this day still of no small import, we f[uote the following from Ellis' Historv of Favette Countv: 134 Daniel French's Enterprises steamer Columbia on Monongahela River DANIEL FRENCH'S ENTERPRLSES. * * * * I was second engineer with Israel Gregg as captain. Part of the load was taken on at Brigdeport, and this having been done, it was announced that she would take her departure the next morning; but no watchman was kept on board and during the night the river fell, so that her bow grounded at the bank and her stern sank and filled, so that several days more elapsed before she could be raised and made ready again. The machinery of this whole establishment was propelled by four steam engines, one with a five-inch bore, one 12 inches, one 14 inches and the other 20 inches (stroke not given). Towards the latter part of his business career, his two sons engaged in bttsiness with him.

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" On the morning of the 27th Christopher Gist arrived at Great Meadows direct from his plantation and told Washington that on the previous day a Washington's Defeat at Great Meadows 9 detachment of the French had visited his place and had committed variolas de])redations, and further informed Washino;ton that he had seen their tracks witliin live miles of Fort Neec-, Ihi' name Washington had given to his intreneliments. She finally ar- rived at the company got possession of her again. He ran her for a time, but made no monev though freight and passage was high. Another boat yard was established in West Brownsville in 1848, by John Cock and Leonard Lcnhart. These three buildings were of brick and virtually formed one building two stories high, 230 feet long and with the exception of the pattern shop, 50 feet wide.

It was the 29th of Jtme when Washington reached Gist's where he received information that a strong French and Indian force was advancing up the Monongahela river from Fort Duquesne. Abram Kimber, and ran for some years on the Ohio, between Pittsburg and Louisville, Ky. About 1826, Abel Cofhn and Michael Miller commenced the building of keel boats in Bridge]:)ort, on an extended scale, and an almost incredible number of them were turned out by these builders. Pringle built a flat-bottom boat for Robert Rogers and Samuel Clark, called the "Visitor," which ran the following suinmer from Pittsburg to Louisville, and made a remarkable success, earning $2,000 more than her entire cost during that one season, and was then sold at $2,000 advance on her entire cost. Au U to partnership and in the follow- ing year the Pringle Boat-Building Company was organized. This brewery used from 40,000 to 45,000 bushels of barley each year. The rate was $1.00 per trip and 50c per day when lying over in a navigable stage of the river, and $5.00 per month in winter.

A cotmcil of war was held and it was decided to con- centrate all the forces at Gist's and there take a stand against the approach- ing foe. John Cock also built a large number of them, and he as well as Coffin and Miller, btiilt some steamboats. Cock built for James May of Pittsburg, the two Ohio river steamers, "Erie" and "Shamrock." Coffin and Miller built the "Reindeer" (second of that name), the "Mountaineer,'' the "Cham]non" (Capt. Pringle, who came here from Bedford County in 1826. The first steamboat on which he worked was the "Highlander," built by Robert Rogers, opposite the saw- mill on Water street, Bridgeport. The success of this boat caused the building of others of similar construction by Mr. He then established a boat yard in West Bro\\ns\-ine. The members of this company were, John Wilkinson, James Storer, John S. It had two steep tubs of 118 barrels capacity each, the one perhaps of a little less capacity. Keel boats were charged 25c per landing or the same per day. On the 29th of November, 1842, the council of Bridgeport, in accordance with "the will of the people, expressed at a town meeting called for the Bridgeport Improvement Society 281 old l-alling Rocks. Keller & Crossan, Contractor.- of rocks down with one massive blast purpose," subscribed one hundred dollars for the purchase of a tire engine for the use of the borough.

After some scouting for reputed French and Indian forces that it after- wards transpired were nine French deserters who were captured and brought into camp, Washington commenced a movement towards the mouth of Red- stone, taking the Nemacolin trail towards Gist's. Though the distance to Gist's from the fort is only thirteen miles, it took them thirteen days to make a passable road over the distance. ' She was built in John Cock's boat yard, a short distance above where Mason, Rogers &' Co.'s flouring mill then stood (now the Eclipse mill), and was launched on Christmas day in the year named. Not far below the Vulcan Iron and Machine Works along in 1825, there stood a brewery. m., on each of said days in the fourth fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth months." An addition was after- wards built to this market house. In the fall of 1832 it appears that a new market house had been built. The wharf was built in 1845 by Henry Marshall at a cost of $903.54.

He [took with him all his own men, ordnance, ample ammunition and most of the wagons. Before reaching Gist's a force was Fort Necessity 11 sent ahead to open up the way from Gist's to the Redstone. Upon her completion she was placed tinder command of Capt. It was an irregular rambling mass of buildings but in the whole contained all the departments of a first-class brewery at that daj\ In 1857 this plant was enlarged by Teece & Toynbee and still more thoroughly equipped for the business. In August of that year the borough council fixed the first rate for wharfage of steamboats.

Accordingly they marched in single tile, early that May morning, to the French camp and forming in line of battle with the English troops on the right and the Indians on the left, the attack was made withotit any further preliminaries. In consequence of the vast importance of the boat-building industry of this place, which is to this day still of no small import, we f[uote the following from Ellis' Historv of Favette Countv: 134 Daniel French's Enterprises steamer Columbia on Monongahela River DANIEL FRENCH'S ENTERPRLSES. * * * * I was second engineer with Israel Gregg as captain. Part of the load was taken on at Brigdeport, and this having been done, it was announced that she would take her departure the next morning; but no watchman was kept on board and during the night the river fell, so that her bow grounded at the bank and her stern sank and filled, so that several days more elapsed before she could be raised and made ready again. The machinery of this whole establishment was propelled by four steam engines, one with a five-inch bore, one 12 inches, one 14 inches and the other 20 inches (stroke not given). Towards the latter part of his business career, his two sons engaged in bttsiness with him.

||

" On the morning of the 27th Christopher Gist arrived at Great Meadows direct from his plantation and told Washington that on the previous day a Washington's Defeat at Great Meadows 9 detachment of the French had visited his place and had committed variolas de])redations, and further informed Washino;ton that he had seen their tracks witliin live miles of Fort Neec-, Ihi' name Washington had given to his intreneliments. She finally ar- rived at the company got possession of her again. He ran her for a time, but made no monev though freight and passage was high. Another boat yard was established in West Brownsville in 1848, by John Cock and Leonard Lcnhart. These three buildings were of brick and virtually formed one building two stories high, 230 feet long and with the exception of the pattern shop, 50 feet wide.

It was the 29th of Jtme when Washington reached Gist's where he received information that a strong French and Indian force was advancing up the Monongahela river from Fort Duquesne. Abram Kimber, and ran for some years on the Ohio, between Pittsburg and Louisville, Ky. About 1826, Abel Cofhn and Michael Miller commenced the building of keel boats in Bridge]:)ort, on an extended scale, and an almost incredible number of them were turned out by these builders. Pringle built a flat-bottom boat for Robert Rogers and Samuel Clark, called the "Visitor," which ran the following suinmer from Pittsburg to Louisville, and made a remarkable success, earning $2,000 more than her entire cost during that one season, and was then sold at $2,000 advance on her entire cost. Au U to partnership and in the follow- ing year the Pringle Boat-Building Company was organized. This brewery used from 40,000 to 45,000 bushels of barley each year. The rate was $1.00 per trip and 50c per day when lying over in a navigable stage of the river, and $5.00 per month in winter.

A cotmcil of war was held and it was decided to con- centrate all the forces at Gist's and there take a stand against the approach- ing foe. John Cock also built a large number of them, and he as well as Coffin and Miller, btiilt some steamboats. Cock built for James May of Pittsburg, the two Ohio river steamers, "Erie" and "Shamrock." Coffin and Miller built the "Reindeer" (second of that name), the "Mountaineer,'' the "Cham]non" (Capt. Pringle, who came here from Bedford County in 1826. The first steamboat on which he worked was the "Highlander," built by Robert Rogers, opposite the saw- mill on Water street, Bridgeport. The success of this boat caused the building of others of similar construction by Mr. He then established a boat yard in West Bro\\ns\-ine. The members of this company were, John Wilkinson, James Storer, John S. It had two steep tubs of 118 barrels capacity each, the one perhaps of a little less capacity. Keel boats were charged 25c per landing or the same per day. On the 29th of November, 1842, the council of Bridgeport, in accordance with "the will of the people, expressed at a town meeting called for the Bridgeport Improvement Society 281 old l-alling Rocks. Keller & Crossan, Contractor.- of rocks down with one massive blast purpose," subscribed one hundred dollars for the purchase of a tire engine for the use of the borough.

After some scouting for reputed French and Indian forces that it after- wards transpired were nine French deserters who were captured and brought into camp, Washington commenced a movement towards the mouth of Red- stone, taking the Nemacolin trail towards Gist's. Though the distance to Gist's from the fort is only thirteen miles, it took them thirteen days to make a passable road over the distance. ' She was built in John Cock's boat yard, a short distance above where Mason, Rogers &' Co.'s flouring mill then stood (now the Eclipse mill), and was launched on Christmas day in the year named. Not far below the Vulcan Iron and Machine Works along in 1825, there stood a brewery. m., on each of said days in the fourth fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth months." An addition was after- wards built to this market house. In the fall of 1832 it appears that a new market house had been built. The wharf was built in 1845 by Henry Marshall at a cost of $903.54.

.00 per trip and 50c per day when lying over in a navigable stage of the river, and .00 per month in winter.

A cotmcil of war was held and it was decided to con- centrate all the forces at Gist's and there take a stand against the approach- ing foe. John Cock also built a large number of them, and he as well as Coffin and Miller, btiilt some steamboats. Cock built for James May of Pittsburg, the two Ohio river steamers, "Erie" and "Shamrock." Coffin and Miller built the "Reindeer" (second of that name), the "Mountaineer,'' the "Cham]non" (Capt. Pringle, who came here from Bedford County in 1826. The first steamboat on which he worked was the "Highlander," built by Robert Rogers, opposite the saw- mill on Water street, Bridgeport. The success of this boat caused the building of others of similar construction by Mr. He then established a boat yard in West Bro\ns\-ine. The members of this company were, John Wilkinson, James Storer, John S. It had two steep tubs of 118 barrels capacity each, the one perhaps of a little less capacity. Keel boats were charged 25c per landing or the same per day. On the 29th of November, 1842, the council of Bridgeport, in accordance with "the will of the people, expressed at a town meeting called for the Bridgeport Improvement Society 281 old l-alling Rocks. Keller & Crossan, Contractor.- of rocks down with one massive blast purpose," subscribed one hundred dollars for the purchase of a tire engine for the use of the borough.

After some scouting for reputed French and Indian forces that it after- wards transpired were nine French deserters who were captured and brought into camp, Washington commenced a movement towards the mouth of Red- stone, taking the Nemacolin trail towards Gist's. Though the distance to Gist's from the fort is only thirteen miles, it took them thirteen days to make a passable road over the distance. ' She was built in John Cock's boat yard, a short distance above where Mason, Rogers &' Co.'s flouring mill then stood (now the Eclipse mill), and was launched on Christmas day in the year named. Not far below the Vulcan Iron and Machine Works along in 1825, there stood a brewery. m., on each of said days in the fourth fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth months." An addition was after- wards built to this market house. In the fall of 1832 it appears that a new market house had been built. The wharf was built in 1845 by Henry Marshall at a cost of 3.54.

He [took with him all his own men, ordnance, ample ammunition and most of the wagons. Before reaching Gist's a force was Fort Necessity 11 sent ahead to open up the way from Gist's to the Redstone. Upon her completion she was placed tinder command of Capt. It was an irregular rambling mass of buildings but in the whole contained all the departments of a first-class brewery at that daj\ In 1857 this plant was enlarged by Teece & Toynbee and still more thoroughly equipped for the business. In August of that year the borough council fixed the first rate for wharfage of steamboats.

Accordingly they marched in single tile, early that May morning, to the French camp and forming in line of battle with the English troops on the right and the Indians on the left, the attack was made withotit any further preliminaries. In consequence of the vast importance of the boat-building industry of this place, which is to this day still of no small import, we f[uote the following from Ellis' Historv of Favette Countv: 134 Daniel French's Enterprises steamer Columbia on Monongahela River DANIEL FRENCH'S ENTERPRLSES. * * * * I was second engineer with Israel Gregg as captain. Part of the load was taken on at Brigdeport, and this having been done, it was announced that she would take her departure the next morning; but no watchman was kept on board and during the night the river fell, so that her bow grounded at the bank and her stern sank and filled, so that several days more elapsed before she could be raised and made ready again. The machinery of this whole establishment was propelled by four steam engines, one with a five-inch bore, one 12 inches, one 14 inches and the other 20 inches (stroke not given). Towards the latter part of his business career, his two sons engaged in bttsiness with him.

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